What are the responsibilities of a content strategist?

 In Uncategorized

A good content strategist can help you market your brand to the right people. In this article, we will detail the role and responsibilities of a continuation strategist.

Contents

Discovery of the brand with new customers

Content audits for new customers

Set up-to-date metadata for the indexing of search engines

Restructuring of the site architecture

Removal of underperforming or useless conti

Suggest improvements to pre-existing content

Competition analysis

Competitive keyword research

Editorial planning

Build a content publication calendar

Creation of content (or management of the creators of content)

Project monitoring and analysis

 

 

The responsibilities of a content strategist vary from company to company. If you work for a large corporation, all your job might be to develop the editorial calendar. If you work for a small business, you can be responsible for a wide range of tasks, some of which don’t even involve strategy.

 

The job title also means different things in different types of businesses. A strategist working for a marketing agency and another working for a single company do not have exactly the same job description.

Either way, the goal is to get the right message across to the right people, ultimately driving sales.

 

Below, we’ll explain how the content strategists achieve this goal. While the exact nature of the role varies depending on the context, these are some of the day-to-day tasks in which most strategists are actively or indirectly involved.

 

 

 

Discovery of the brand with new customers

In agencies here creating content on behalf of other clients, strategists should start by knowing the client and educating themselves about their needs. This process is known as the “discovery” process. The internal marketing specialists follow a similar process with products rather than with customers.

 

During the discovery process, you should educate yourself about the following:

 

Ideal client: Who is the target audience?

Products / Services: What solution do they offer to the problems of their ideal customers?

Brand Identity: How do they want the audience to perceive their business?

Brand voice: how do they want to “sound” to their audience?

 

History: When the enterprise was founded, by whom and how has it developed over time?

Competitors: Who else offers similar products and targets a similar ideal customer?

Most importantly, you need to educate yourself about the goals of the cli

Are they investing in the marketing services of content for promoting a specific product?  Do they just want to increase organic web traffic in the hopes that it will increase revenue?

 

 

 

Either way, this information will help you create campaigns that match the brand, goals, and ideally their target audience of your customer.

 

However, a solid discovery interview is crucial for a good strategy of marketing of contents. Whether conducting the interview or not, strategists should always be thinking of new questions for customers and ways to improve the discovery process.

Content audits for new customers

Whether you are marketing contents for your own business or for a client, the first step is to examine the existing contents to see how the function works. This will show you what you or your client is doing right and where the contents could improve.

 

Later, when your content strategy is ready to be implemented, making these improvements will be the first task on your to-do lists.

 

These tasks may include:

Set up-to-date metadata for the indexing of search engines

Metadata is any information on a website that does not appear on the page itself. Title tags, for example, let search engines know what your website is about so they can properly index your pages.

 

The updated set of these tags and other metadata can be useful for the optimization of the search engines (SEO), in increasing the visibility of the site in the associated searches.

 

Restructuring of the site architecture

It’s easy for websites to get messed up, especially if you have a lot of different pages

For this reason, digital marketing strategists often set aside time to review the information architecture of their clients’ sites.

A well-organized site is also good for SEO, as search engines can easily identify the topic of each page and index it accordingly.

 

Remove underperforming or unnecessary content

Most sites at least have some content that doesn’t need to be there.

This includes:

Pages with little or no traffic

Old versions of pages updated since

Duplicate pages that made their way online in one way or another

Use a tool like Ahrefs or SEMrush to identify these pages. If you can’t or don’t want to improve them so that they actually add value to your site, delete them.

 

This is important because Google only indexes a limited number of pages on each website, and those underperforming pages could distract from the pages you actually want the crawler to notice.

See: Chapter 2: How search engines work: crawling, indexing and ranking

Suggest improvements to pre-existing content

It’s possible that your client’s site is already ranking on the first page of the SERPs for certain keywords or is about to do so. That’s great – a few small improvements could give these pages the boost they need to slide onto the first page of Google results for target keywords.

 

Additionally, if your customer’s current website is missing basic information like their address, phone number, social media IDs, or hours of operation, you’ll need to let them know. Even if your contract is for blog content, it will be beneficial for both of you to get them to update their homepage.

After all, if you create blog content for a restaurant but they don’t have a menu on their site or a Google My Business page, your content will likely be useless no matter how well written it is.

 

We can audit your site and help you develop a solid content strategy! Learn more about our content marketing services.

Competition analysis

No brand exists in a vacuum. Every business has competitors, and these competitors have their own content strategies.

Looking at what and where competitors are posting online can tell you what and where to post online.

This is one of the main tasks of a content strategist: to analyze the content of the competition, then use that information to develop your own strategy.

Maybe there’s a low difficulty / high volume keyword that they aren’t targeting, for example, leaving you with the option to search for it. Or maybe they have a blog that drives traffic to their website, but isn’t very long.

A good strategist would recognize this opportunity and set out to create a better article on this topic.

Competitive keyword research

Simply put, keyword research is a way to find topics to create content on. Specifically, it’s a data-driven way to find topics to create content on.

 

Using keyword research tools like Ahrefs, you can learn:

 

What terms people search the most

The exact number of people who search for these terms each month

How hard it will be to appear on the first page when people googling these terms

 

 

You can also see which keywords your competition is ranking for. In other words, you can see which Google searches are driving organic traffic to their site and whether or not you can rank for those searches as well (based on your site’s current reputation / rating).

 

During the competitive analysis process, the content strategist examines all of this information. They determine which keywords are worth targeting and which are unrealistic to rank. They also look for keywords that can be ranked but that the competition is not targeting.

 

 

 

Editorial planning

With a list of keywords in hand, you can start brainstorming content ideas around those keywords. The goal is to create an editorial calendar, or a long-term plan to create content and publish it online.

 

A talented strategist takes many different factors into account when coming up with content ideas.

 

 

For example, the strategist will also think about the brand personality of the company.

 

What are they good at?

What are they doing better than their competition?

How can content communicate this?

They will also think about the target audience. What type of content do they like the most? And what kinds of questions do they ask that other content doesn’t answer?

 

In other words, if you find a research question with high volume but not enough answers on any page, it should be at the top of your editorial calendar. Even if there is a page but you think you could do it better, it should be part of your marketing plan.

 

Tip: A sure-fire way to find great blog topics is to go to online communities like Reddit and Quora to find the most frequently asked questions. If people ask a question over and over again in a forum, it probably means there isn’t a sufficient answer on Google. Your page should be this response sufficient.

Build a content posting schedule

The final timeline should include (at a minimum):

 

The title / subject of each piece of content

Type of content (blog, white paper, infographic, etc.)

Content objective (develop brand awareness, convert sales, etc.)

Author / creator

Publication deadline

Try to plan your editorial calendar for 3-6 months if possible. We recommend that you review the content plan after each quarter and update your plans when needed. It also gives you space to modify your schedule to accommodate changes in the competitive landscape.

Content creation (or management of content creators)

 

This is a place where the job description differs depending on the company, especially the size of the company.

 

In a large organization, the strategist is usually not involved in content production – they are likely to manage multiple campaigns at once and only focus on strategy.

 

In a small business, however, the strategist may be responsible for writing, video editing, or other content creation tasks. They may also be responsible for publishing content through the company’s content management system.

 

Now, this is not always the case. Some specialty marketing companies have a full-time team of in-house writers, editors, and editors. Others outsource the work to freelancers. But, if the strategist isn’t responsible for creating the content himself, he probably works with or manages the people who do it.

Project monitoring and analysis

This is the most important step in any marketing campaign: review, follow-up and analysis.

 

The Content Strategist uses tools like Google Analytics, Search Console, SEMRush, and Ahrefs to measure content performance against various metrics. The exact metrics they choose to measure depend on the campaign, the customer’s business goals, and a number of other factors.

 

Some examples:

 

How much organic traffic did this blog generate to the website?

How many downloads of white papers or email subscriptions did it generate?

What is the SERP ranking of this web page on Google?

Tracking these metrics from the moment they are released will let you know how the part is performing. When it doesn’t perform up to par, you can make changes to improve it. If it exceeds your expectations, you can analyze it, learn from it, and apply what you’ve learned to some of the worst performing parts of your site.

 

While the exact role of a content strategist will vary depending on the context, the goal is always to deliver something valuable to the audience. Whether it’s text, images, or a combination of the two, strong content can build brand awareness and steer potential customers to a conversion.

 

 

The key is to deliver the content that the audience needs, however, and that is the job of the strategist.

See as well:

 

What is Evergreen content? How to create sustainable SEO content

Is content marketing the key to e-commerce success?

The importance of having quality content on your website

How to write an SEO article: 9 techniques for writing professional content

 

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Discovery of the brand with new customers

In agencies that create content on behalf of other clients, strategists should start by knowing the client and educating themselves about their needs. This process is known as the “discovery” process. Internal marketers go through a similar process with products rather than with customers.

 

During the discovery process, you should educate yourself about the following:

 

Ideal client: Who is the target audience?

Products / Services: What solution do they offer to the problems of their ideal customers?

Brand Identity: How do they want the audience to perceive their business?

Brand voice: how do they want to “sound” to their audience?

Company values: what does the company represent / think is important?

History: When the company was founded, by whom and how has it developed over time?

Competitors: Who else has similar products and targets a similar ideal customer?

Most importantly, you need to educate yourself about the client’s goals.

 

Are they investing in content marketing services to promote a specific product? Is their goal to increase walk-in visits to their physical locations? Do they just want to increase organic web traffic in the hope that it increases revenue?

Either way, this information will help you create campaigns that match the brand, goals, and ideally their target audience of your customer.

 

Note: Content strategists aren’t necessarily the only people conducting customer discovery interviews. In many businesses, this is the role of an account manager.

 

However, a solid discovery interview is crucial for a good content marketing strategy. Whether conducting the interview or not, strategists should always be thinking of new questions for customers and ways to improve the discovery proces

Content audits for new customers

Whether you are doing content marketing for your own business or for a client, the first step is to take a look at existing content to see how it works. This will show you what you or your client is doing right and where the content could improve.

 

Later, when your content strategy is ready to go, making those improvements will be the first task on your to-do list.

These tasks may include:

 

Updating metadata for search engine indexing

Metadata is any information on a website that does not appear on the page itself. Title tags, for example, let search engines know what your website is about so they can properly index your pages.

 

Updating these tags and other metadata can be useful for search engine optimization (SEO), increasing the site’s visibility in related searches.

 

Restructuring of the site architecture

It’s easy for websites to get messed up, especially if you have a lot of different pages.

For this reason, digital marketing strategists often set aside time to review the information architecture of their clients’ sites.

 

A well-organized site is also good for SEO, as search engines can easily identify the topic of each page and index it accordingly.

 

Remove underperforming or unnecessary content

Most sites at least have some content that doesn’t need to be there.

This includes:

 

Pages with little or no traffic

Old versions of pages updated since

Duplicate pages that made their way online in one way or another

Use a tool like Ahrefs or SEMrush to identify these pages. If you can’t or don’t want to improve them so that they actually add value to your site, delete them.

 

This is important because Google only indexes a limited number of pages on each website, and those underperforming pages could distract from the pages you actually want the crawler to notice.

Suggest improvements to pre-existing content

It’s possible that your client’s site is already ranking on the first page of the SERPs for certain keywords or is about to do so. That’s great – a few small improvements could give these pages the boost they need to slide onto the first page of Google results for target keywords.

 

Additionally, if your customer’s current website is missing basic information like their address, phone number, social media IDs, or hours of operation, you’ll need to let them know. Even if your contract is for blog content, it will be beneficial for both of you to get them to update their homepage.

After all, if you create blog content for a restaurant but they don’t have a menu on their site or a Google My Business page, your content will likely be useless no matter how well written it is.

 

Competition analysis

No brand exists in a vacuum. Every business has competitors, and these competitors have their own content strategies. Looking at what and where competitors are posting online can tell you what and where to post online.

 

This is one of the main tasks of a content strategist: to analyze the content of the competition, then use that information to develop your own strategy.

 

Maybe there’s a low difficulty / high volume keyword that they aren’t targeting, for example, leaving you with the option to search for it. Or maybe they have a blog that drives traffic to their website, but isn’t very long. A good strategist would recognize this opportunity and set out to create a better article on this topic.

 

Competitive keyword research

Simply put, keyword research is a way to find topics to create content on. Specifically, it’s a data-driven way to find topics to create content on.

 

Using keyword research tools like Ahrefs, you can learn:

 

What terms people search the most

The exact number of people who search for these terms each month

How hard it will be to appear on the first page when people googling these terms

You can also see which keywords your competition is ranking for. In other words, you can see which Google searches are driving organic traffic to their site and whether or not you can rank for those searches as well (based on your site’s current reputation / rating).

 

During the competitive analysis process, the content strategist examines all of this information. They determine which keywords are worth targeting and which are unrealistic to rank. They also look for keywords that can be ranked but that the competition is not targeting.

 

 

 

Editorial planning

The goal is to create an editorial calendar, or a long-term plan to create content and publish it online.

A talented strategist takes many different factors into account when coming up with content ideas.

For example, the strategist will also think about the brand personality of the company.

 

What are they good at?

What are they doing better than their competition?

How can content communicate this?

They will also think about the target audience. What type of content do they like the most? And what kinds of questions do they ask that other content doesn’t answer?

 

In other words, if you find a research question with high volume but not enough answers on any page, it should be at the top of your editorial calendar. Even if there is a page but you think you could do it better, it should be part of your marketing plan.

 

Tip: A sure-fire way to find great blog topics is to go to online communities like Reddit and Quora to find the most frequently asked questions. If people ask a question over and over again in a forum, it probably means there isn’t a sufficient answer on Google. Your page should be this response sufficient.

 

Build a content posting schedule

The final timeline should include (at a minimum):

The title / subject of each piece of content

Type of content (blog, white paper, infographic, etc.)

Content objective (develop brand awareness, convert sales, etc.)

Author / creator

Publication deadline

Try to plan your editorial calendar for 3-6 months if possible. We recommend that you review the content plan after each quarter and update your plans when needed. It also gives you space to modify your schedule to accommodate changes in the competitive landscape.

 

Content creation (or management of content creators)

This is a place where the job description differs depending on the company, especially the size of the company.

 

In a large organization, the strategist is usually not involved in content production – they are likely to manage multiple campaigns at once and only focus on strategy.

 

In a small business, however, the strategist may be responsible for writing, video editing, or other content creation tasks.

They may also be responsible for publishing content through the company’s content management system.

Now, this is not always the case. Some specialty marketing companies have a full-time team of in-house writers, editors, and editors. Others outsource the work to freelancers.

But, if the strategist isn’t responsible for creating the content himself, he probably works with or manages the people who do it.

Project monitoring and analysis

This is the most important step in any marketing campaign: review, follow-up and analysis.

 

The Content Strategist uses tools like Google Analytics, Search Console, SEMRush, and Ahrefs to measure content performance against various metrics. The exact metrics they choose to measure depend on the campaign, the customer’s business goals, and a number of other factors.

Some examples:

How much organic traffic did this blog generate to the website?

How many downloads of white papers or email subscriptions did it generate?

What is the SERP ranking of this web page on Google?

Tracking these metrics from the moment they are released will let you know how the part is performing. When it doesn’t perform up to par, you can make changes to improve it.

If it exceeds your expectations, you can analyze it, learn from it, and apply what you’ve learned to some of the worst performing parts of your site.

 

While the exact role of a content strategist will vary depending on the context, the goal is always to deliver something valuable to the audience.

Whether it’s text, images, or a combination of the two, strong content can build brand awareness and steer potential customers to a conversion.

The key is to deliver the content that the audience needs, however, and that is the job of the strategist.

If you have a knack for analyzing audiences and can deliver the content they’re looking for, you’ll be a great asset to any business.

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